Explore

Explore Western Nebraska By Tag

There are 20 pages about Where To Go

May 2016
Lemoyne
Lemoyne

Photo by Nebraska Tourism   The unincorporated community of Lemoyne, near where Lonergan Creek flows into Lake McConaughy, had its all-time high population of 90 people back in 1960. There were just a few souls less than that in the most recent census. The original community of Lemoyne was

Read More
Brule
Brule

Nine miles west of Ogallala is the community of Brule. It was founded in 1886 on the site of a former Brule Sioux encampment.

Read More
Whitney
Whitney

Photo by Nebraska Tourism   The community of Dawes City formed in 1885. When the railroad arrived but stayed north of the White River, the town of Earth Lodge formed. Buildings were moved to the new town, and it later became Whitney. Old Fort Useless was built nine miles from town to protec

Read More
Pine Ridge Home of Buffalo Bill Legend
Pine Ridge Home of Buffalo Bill Legend

   It was on this lonely hillside 137 years ago that the most famous showman of the Wild West was said to have outgunned a Cheyenne warrior and taken his scalp as revenge for the killing of Lt. Col. George Armstrong Custer three weeks earlier at the Battle of Little Bighorn. What re

Read More
Ogallala's Soap Box Joyride
Ogallala's Soap Box Joyride

Two speed racers have climbed into their little rockets on wheels, boldly braving the whipping wind racing across Ogallala. These helmeted riders are all of 9 years old, but the boy and girl both have the steely-eyed determination of veteran NASCAR road warriors as they stare down a 34-foot dive

Read More
Sidney Soars on High Plains
Sidney Soars on High Plains

There’s even more optimism rolling about than the freight trains from the three railroad lines constantly moving through town. But the trail of Sidney has had many twists and turns, starting in the 1870s when the most feared desperados of the Wild West lurked here. The community’s jou

Read More
Good Times in the Badlands
Good Times in the Badlands

Our Heritage Guest Ranch is a rock of the Badlands. Homesteaded by Swedish immigrants Andrew and Johanna Rosenburg in 1887, the ranch provided food and lodging to railroad crews toiling in the area all the live-long day. At night they returned for rest, a hearty meal and to have equipment repaire

Read More
Nenzel and Cody
Nenzel and Cody

Nenzel and Cody Near Nenzel visitors taste the Sandhills at Niobrara Valley Vineyards. (402) 823-4131. Cody-Kilgore High School students helped build the strawbale Circle C Market and operate it. (402) 823-4099.

Read More
Ashby
Ashby

Photo by Alan J. Bartels   Ashby Just cross the tracks north of Highway 2 and find one of the most unique shops with Nebraska’s own “Pot Lady.” CaLinda’s Pot Shop & Art Gallery showcases owner Linda Lacy’s one-of-a-kind creations of clay and canvas. Experi

Read More
Gordon Howard's Chimney Rock
Gordon Howard's Chimney Rock

When the sun rises just right, the homestead where Gordon Howard was born 78 years ago in a two-story sod house is touched by the shadow of Chimney Rock. The iconic landmark that served as an important milestone to roughly half a million westward pioneers in the 1800s has been a part of his life eve

Read More
Harrisburg
Harrisburg

BeeHaven Farm Roadside Market, Photo by Alan J. Bartels Turning north from Kimball, State Highway 71 will take you past Harrisburg. The Banner County Museum is an 11-building complex that includes a 19th-century log schoolhouse, sod house, log cabin, 1910 barn, pioneer church and the old Banner C

Read More
Kimball
Kimball

Kimball began as a railroad construction camp. Because of large herds of pronghorn in the area, the railroad called the new station Antelope, and the new village, Antelopeville. In 1885, the growing settlement was renamed for railroad executive Thomas Kimball. Kimball’s history is displayed

Read More
Potter
Potter

Potter Duckpin Bowling Alley   You don’t have to go far out of your way to visit downtown Potter – it’s just a minute’s drive from I-80. Unwind at city parks or at the Reading Garden beside the library downtown. In one of several restored historic buildings, Potte

Read More
Sidney
Sidney

Photo by Joshua Hardin If this were an 1870s travel guide, we’d advise you to go around Sidney. Outlaws, gamblers and other riffraff made this railroad town one of the toughest places in all of the American West. Stay on the train, lock the doors and you’ll be fine. Unless there&r

Read More
Lodgepole
Lodgepole

Old Settlers’ Days is the big event of the year for Lodgepole. A free barbecue, mud volleyball tournament, parade and street dance are just a few of the events that take place during the Labor Day weekend celebration. Sullivan Hills is located just north of Lodgepole and features 640 acres

Read More
Chappell
Chappell

Travelers see grain elevators along I-80, but none with a paint job like the Farmers Elevator in Chappell. An American flag 52 feet by 100 feet is painted on its south side. The nine-hole Chappell Golf Course. Chappell Lake is just north of the interchange and offers fishing, native grasses, wildf

Read More
Big Springs
Big Springs

Heading west from Ogallala on I-80, you’ll come to Big Springs. Heading west from Ogallala on I-80, you’ll come to Big Springs. The first and largest robbery of a Union Pacific train happened here in 1877. Texas outlaw Sam Bass and five companions made off with $60,000 in gold and curren

Read More
Keystone
Keystone

  East of Kingsley Dam, Keystone is home to a most unique church. Built in 1908, the Little Church of Keystone is the result of cooperation and ingenuity. The town was too small for two churches, so this one was built as a combined Catholic/Protestant church. It has a Catholic altar at one end

Read More
Ogallala
Ogallala
Nebraska’s “Cowboy Capital”

Ogallala was the “Gomorrah of the cattle trail,” wrote Andy Adams, a trail driver who first saw the community in 1875. In the 1870s and 1880s, Ogallala was the end of the trail as cowboys drove herds of longhorns up from Texas to be shipped east on the Union Pacific Railroad. After sev

Read More